Ancient Trees: Woman Spends 14 Years Photographing World’s Oldest Trees

A photographer based in San Francisco, Beth Moon, has been exploring the oldest trees present in this planet since the past fourteen years! Her dedication in photographing the oldest trees has made her travel all around the globe to visit the oldest trees located in some of the highly inaccessible and remote locations of Earth. She is of the belief that the old trees are symbolic and are part of the oldest and largest monuments present in today’s world.

All her pictures are captured in duotone and can definitely be termed as the best ever captured photos of old trees. Her photographs are published in the book named “ Ancient Trees: Portraits of Time”, which has a collection of 60 exquisite photographs of some of the oldest and most magnificent trees one would ever be able to view! More info: bethmoon.comabbeville.com (h/t: colossal)

ancient trees beth moon

ancient trees beth moon

ancient trees beth moon

ancient trees beth moon

ancient trees beth moon

ancient trees beth moon

ancient trees beth moon

ancient trees beth moon

ancient trees beth moon

ancient trees beth moon

ancient trees beth moon

ancient trees beth moon

ancient trees beth moon

ancient trees beth moon

ancient trees beth moon

ancient trees beth moon

ancient trees beth moon

ancient trees beth moon

ancient trees beth moon

ancient trees beth moon

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Loving Photos of Frida Kahlo from the Last Years of Her Life in Mexico City

In 1950, photographer Gisèle Freund embarked on a two-week trip to Mexico, but she wouldn’t leave until two years later. There she met the legendary couple Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. Welcomed into their home, she immersed herself in their private lives and the cultural and artistic diversity of the country, taking hundreds of photographs. These powerful photographs, among the last taken before Kahlo’s death, bear poignant witness to Frida’s beauty and talent.

Frida Kahlo at work, 1951—Photo: © Gisèle Freund / IMEC / Fonds MCC


Frida Kahlo at home in Mexico City, 1951—Photo: © Gisèle Freund / IMEC / Fonds MCC


Frida Kahlo in the garden of her house, La Casa Azul, in Coyoacán, Mexico City, 1951—Photo: © Gisèle Freund / IMEC / Fonds MCC


Photo: © Gisèle Freund / IMEC / Fonds MCC


Photo: © Gisèle Freund / IMEC / Fonds MCC


Frida Kahlo in her garden, 1951—Photo: © IMEC / Fonds MCC / Dist. Rmn / Photo Gisèle Freund


Frida Kahlo in front of the ornamental pool in her garden, 1951—Photo: © IMEC / Fonds MCC / Dist. Rmn / Photo Gisèle Freund


Frida Kahlo in her garden, 1951—Photo: © IMEC / Fonds MCC / Dist. Rmn / Photo Gisèle Freund


Frida Kahlo with her dogs in Coyoacán, Mexico City, 1951—Photo: © Gisèle Freund / IMEC / Fonds MCC


Frida Kahlo in her garden, 1951—Photo: © IMEC / Fonds MCC / Dist. Rmn / Photo Gisèle Freund


Frida Kahlo, 1951—Photo: © Gisèle Freund / IMEC / Fonds MCC


Frida Kahlo in her studio painting Portrait of My Father, 1951—Photo: © Gisèle Freund / IMEC / Fonds MCC


Frida Kahlo and Dr. Juan Farill photographed in her home, 1951—Photo: © Gisèle Freund / IMEC / Fonds MCC


Photo: © Gisèle Freund / IMEC / Fonds MCC


Photo: © Gisèle Freund / IMEC / Fonds MCC


Frida Frida lying on her bed, 1951—Photo: © Gisèle Freund / IMEC / Fonds MCC


Frida Kahlo in her studio painting Portrait of My Father, 1951—Photo: © Gisèle Freund / IMEC / Fonds MCC


A rare and detailed portrait of Frida Kahlo in 1951—Photo: © Gisèle Freund / IMEC / Fonds MCC


Interior view of Kahlo’s house, 1951—Photo: © Gisèle Freund / IMEC / Fonds MCC


Interior view of Kahlo’s house, 1951—Photo: © Gisèle Freund / IMEC / Fonds MCC


Mask, doll, and ex-votos in Kahlo’s house, 1951—Photo: © Gisèle Freund / IMEC / Fonds MCC

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German street artist 1010 show the real beauty of the city!

1010 (pronounced ten-ten) first began creating his hypnotic “portals” in 2009 throughout the city of Hamburg. These spray-painted murals bring a contradicting depth to the flat walls they are painted on, consequently turning the side of an ordinary building into an entrancing abyss one could seemingly walk into. Striking layers of color appear to overlap and yawn in succession, eventually fading into a dark and limitless center. While mapping out an external form, 1010 begins each piece from the center, working his way through each color, eventually reaching the lightest shades of color around the perimeter. The resulting polychromatic grottos disrupt the stagnant structures of the urban landscape, bringing a beauty and mystery to the systematic components of the city they inhabit.

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